Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International conference on Cardiovascular Medicine Manchester, UK.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Peter Sever

Imperial College London, UK

Keynote: Adverse reactions to statins: Fact or fantasy

Time : 09:05-09:40

OMICS International Cardiovascular 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Peter Sever photo
Biography:

Peter Sever is Professor of Clinical Pharmacology at the National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London. He graduated from the University of Cambridgernand has a PhD from the University of London. He is Past President of the British Hypertension Society, current Joint Chief Editor of the Journal of thernRenin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System and Honorary Fellow, Trinity Hall, Cambridge. His research interests include the aetiology and pathophysiology of vascularrndisease and clinical trials of cardiovascular disease prevention. He has published more than 350 papers in peer review journals.

Abstract:

As many as one in three adults would benefit from lipid-lowering with a statin. Current guidelines advocate statin usernfor all patients with established atherosclerotic disease and, in primary prevention, for those at an estimated 10 yearrn cardiovascular risk of 7.5-10%. In clinical practice, reports in the medical and lay press of the high frequency of putative adverse reactions to statins have influenced the uptake of statins by patients, not only in secondary prevention, but also in primary prevention, thereby exposing an increasing number of patients to the risk of preventable cardiovascular disease. Inrndouble-blind, randomized, trials adverse events are reported equally by those assigned statin or placebo, however, in open observational studies up to 20% of patients claim that adverse events, particularly muscle related symptoms, are associated with statin use. In order to further investigate this apparent discrepancy, the unique opportunity provided by over 10,000 patients participating in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial Lipid-lowering Arm was used to compare adversere events associated with blinded use of statin in the first 3 years of the trial, with adverse events during open label statin usernover the 2 year extension of the trial, using characterization and classification of events according to the Medical Dictionaryrnfor Regulatory Activities (MedRA) for the coding of reports. The results of these observations, which it is anticipated will have a major impact on clinical practice, including the prescribing of statins and their acceptability to patients, will be published shortly, and will be discussed in the presentation.

Keynote Forum

Jeffrey R Bender

Yale University School of Medicine, USA

Keynote: Integrin-induced effects on RNA stability in angiogenesis and inflammatory disease

Time : 09:40-10:15

OMICS International Cardiovascular 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jeffrey R Bender photo
Biography:

Jeffrey R. Bender graduated from the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine in 1979. He works in New Haven, CT and specializes in Cardiovascular Disease. Jeffrey R. Bender is affiliated with Yale New Haven Hospital.

Abstract:

Cardiovascular physiology and pathology involves the expression of angiogenic, proteolytic and inflammatory genes in arnwide variety of contexts. Many of the RNA transcripts encoding these gene products are very labile, leading to minimal gene expression, unless the mRNA is protected from degradation (stabilized). Leukocyte recruitment to, and localization in, many tissues requires the engagement of integrin adhesion receptors, promoting leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium and transmigration into tissues. In both innate (monocyte/macrophage) and adaptive (T lymphocyte) immune cells, engagement of the beta2 integrin LFA-1 results in the rapid and dramatic modulation of an important mRNA-binding protein, HuR, leading to protection of labile transcripts from degradation, and prolongation of their half-lives with enhanced gene expression. Monocyte/macrophages are important producers of the key angiogenic/arteriogenic factor VEGF-A, which is encoded by a transcript that is intrinsically unstable. Integrin engagement in human and mouse macrophages results in marked, HuR dependent stabilization of the VEGF-A mRNA. The signal transduction cascade downstream of integrin engagement includes activation of the small Rho family GTPase Rac2, and its consequent interaction with the non-muscle myosin IIA (MyIIA). Using the murine model of hindlimb ischemia, a powerful model for the study of arteriogenic responses to ischemia, and targeting either Rac2 or MyIIA selectively in macrophages, we showed that a complete revascularizing, arteriogenic response to ischemia requires macrophage Rac2 and MyIIA. Animals with either of these genes deleted in a myeloid-specific fashionrnhave impaired arteriogenic responses to ischemia, as detected by laser Doppler flow imaging. This was not due to failed tissue localization of macrophages, but to their inability to produce angiogenic factors at sufficient levels. Using a different model of inflammation, the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis, which involves profound CNS immune/inflammatory reactions mediated largely by the Th17 subset of T lymphocytes, we showed that CNS production of a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-17A, requires integrin-mediated, HuR-dependent stabilization of its transcript. Mice with Th17-targeted deletion of HuR are completely protected against the development of EAE, with greatly reduced CNS levels of IL-17A mRNA and protein, despite equal numbers of localizing immune cells. In this presentation, a major molecular switch for the production of angiogenic, immune and proteolytic genes in vascular and target organ inflammatory environments is described. This defines a new therapeutic target for the inflammatory component of cardiovascular disease.

  • Sessions: Cardiovascular Surgeries | Cardiovascular Diseases
Location: Manchester, UK
Speaker

Chair

Hatem AlMasri

King Abdulaziz Medical City, Saudi Arabia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Massimo Capoccia

University of Strathclyde, UK

Speaker
Biography:

Massimo Capoccia is a Cardiac Surgeon with particular interest in heart failure and mechanical circulatory support. In view of his additional interest in cardiovascular engineering, he is currently pursuing his research interest at the University of Strathclyde as a part-time PhD Student. He has published articles in peer reviewed journals and he enjoys the teaching aspect of his clinical activity aiming to be a role model for his junior colleagues. He strongly believes in close cooperation with engineers and scientists in order to achieve a patient-specific modelling approach in clinical practice.

Abstract:

The impact of Ventricular Assist Devices (VAD) for the treatment of advanced heart failure has played a significant role as a bridge for transplantation and more recently as a long-term solution for non eligible candidates. Continuous flow rotary blood pumps are currently the most popular devices because of their size and performance and the trend towards their use is increasing. Although, very successful and technologically advanced, but still thrombus formation remains a feared complication that can affect clinical outcome. VADs operate in a flow regime which is difficult to simulate as the transitional region is at the boundary of laminar and turbulent flow (low Reynolds number). Different methods have been used but the best approach remains debatable. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been an attractive and invaluable tool for the study of the interactions between VADs and the cardiovascular system. The development of a pre-operative strategy aimed at the reduction of complications and patient-device suitability may be appropriate. Patient-specific modelling based on 3D reconstruction from CT-scan combined with computational fluid dynamic studies is an attractive solution in order to identify potential areas of stagnation or challenging anatomy that could be addressed to achieve the desired outcome. The HeartMate II (axial) and the HeartWare HVAD (centrifugal) rotary blood pumps have been now used worldwide with proven outcome. There are enough pumps on the market; it is now time to focus on the complications in order to achieve the full potential and selling-point of this type of technology for the treatment of the increasing heart failure patient population.

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break: 10:45-11:00 @ Outside Room
Speaker
Biography:

Arun Beeman completed his cardiothoracic and vascular surgery training in The Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research in India in 2015. He has special interest in Pediatric cardiac surgery and heart lung transplants. He is a member of Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh from 2011 and also a life member of Tamil Nadu Medical Council, India. He has 2 international publications and also won the upcoming young surgeon award (SUNDARAM AWARD) in 2008, awarded by Tamil Nadu and Pondicherry Association of Surgeons, India. At present working as specialty registrar in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery in Great Ormond street, London.

Abstract:

Objective: A retrospective study was undertaken to find out the prevalence of aortic wall diseases among the South Indian population Methods: The databases of all patients admitted with aortic wall diseases from August 2008 to July 2012, in the department of cardiothoracic and vascular surgery at our center were analyzed. Results: Among the 49 patients diagnosed to have aortic wall disease, 20 patients (40%) had aortic aneurysm, 18 patients (37%) had aortic occlusive disease and 11 patients (22%) had aortic dissection. The mean age of presentation for males and females were 48 years and 35 years respectively. Majority (67%) of the patients with aortic wall disease were hypertensive. Coronary artery disease was associated only in 8 patients (16%). Average time taken to diagnose aortic vessel wall disease varied from few days to years. The diameter of ascending aorta was more than 5 cm in 85% of patients. More than 60% of the patients with aortic occlusion disease had to travel an average of 220 km from their place of residence for final diagnosis of the disease. Nearly 40% of the patients with aortic occlusion had critical limb ischemia at the time of definitive diagnosis. Conclusion: This study will help in deriving population based screening program to detect the aortic diseases at the earlier stage in all the high risk selective groups so that the expensive and hi-tech dependent investigations and the other resources can be appropriately utilized.

Hatem AlMasri

King Abdulaziz Medical City, Saudi Arabia

Title: Suture less aortic bio prostheses a reliable tool for avr in high risk patients

Time : 11:30-12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Hatem Al-Masri is a cardiac critical care intensivist and consultant of cardiac surgery. Dr. Al-Masri completed his medical degree (M.D.-doctorate) at Charles University – Faculty of Medicine, holds a degree in biochemistry from the University of Waterloo - Canada, completed his residency training in Germany (Leading Facharzt) and holds training fellowships in Cardiac Surgery from IJN KL Malaysia, Switzerland, and Canada. Dr. Al-Masri is the author of an award-wining medical research paper titled “Hemodynamic Support Requires Integrated Approach Comparing pl.VAD vs. IABP in Patients Experiencing Left Venticular Failure” (Best Paper of Young Cardiac Surgeon) at the 8th International Congress of Update in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery (UCCVS 2012) awarded by European Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, World Society of Arrhythmias (WSA ) and the Society of Cardiology and the International Academic of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (ISCP). Dr. Al-Masri is a member of the Medical German Association, Malaysian Medical Association and the Saudi Medical Council.

Abstract:

Background: Surgical aortic valve replacement whether mechanical or biological valves is the treatment of choice in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis (< or = 0.61 cm(2)/m(2)) or with left ventricular dysfunction, advanced age with severe comorbidities. As a matter of fact, bioprosthesis of both types, Sutured and Sutureless aortic valve, last is a new prosthesis and promising tool because it provides excellent early and long-term clinical outcomes in terms of potential hemodynamics, valve durability, and freedom from valve-related complications. Theses valves were designed to be less obstructive, and thus result in a lower transvalvular gradient. Technically the implantations of these valves are more demanding resulting in longer cross clamp and bypass times. Sutureless aortic bioprosthetic valves, introduced in clinical practice in 2009. Surure technique is of two types, contrary to the conventional surgical technique for implantation (conventional interrupted or continuous sutures, after thorough annular decalcification). Numerous advantages such as simple, quick, and effective with regard of continuous. However, important comorbid conditions in elderly patients referred for aortic valve replacement require alternative treatment options with possible reductions of the extracorporeal bypass time and reliable hemodynamic features. In order to comply with these requirements, percutaneous valves and sutureless surgical valves have been developed. The percutaneous technique has the advantage of being performed without circulatory bypass but leaving the aortic calcifications in place, thereby resulting in a high degree of paravalvular insufficiency, atrioventricular block and strokes. However, it requires cardiopulmonary bypass. In addition, it can be performed with a low mortality (<3% in isolated aortic replacement, even in older patients). This article reviews the various techniques, strength and limitations of these sutureless valves implanted in the aortic position. Methods: Comparing intraoperative data, postoperative clinical outcomes, and echocardiographic results from patients receiving 3f Enable, Perceval S and Intuity, randomized study trials showed a hemodynamic advantage for stentless valves, but several could not reach a significant level three devices are currently available. The 3f Enable (ATS, Minneapolis, USA) and the Perceval S (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy) have a CE mark, whereas the intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) is still under investigation. We present the above valves, focusing on the Perceval S. The Sorin Perceval S is a biologic pericardial aortic valve assembled in a metal super elastic alloy stent and implanted in the aortic root without the need of suturing. The design of stentless valve prostheses is intended to achieve a more physiological flow pattern and superior hemodynamics in comparison to stented valves. Results: Between January 2010 to June 2010, 134 patients with aortic valve stenosis underwent aortic valve replacement alone or with other concomitant cardiac procedures including mitral valve surgery in our hospital. Baseline patient characteristics were similar in both groups. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: Ninty-Seven patients (67%) in the P group and 37 patients (59.5%) in the E group (P = 0.24) underwent minimally invasive AVR with either ministernotomy or right anterior minithoracotomy approach. There were no statistical differences between two groups in age, sex, body surface area, concomitant cardiac procedures, blood loss, and postoperative extubation time., aortic cross-clamp time was 31 ± 12 minutes in the P group and 53 ± 25 minutes in the E group (P < 0.0015) , survival was 97% (one death in the P group). In five patients (P group = 1, E group = 4), a moderate paravalvular leak was present. Conclusions: This new technology may offer improved results. Cost-effectiveness and fine-tuning of patient selection are two aspects that future investigation should address. The sutureless Perceval S aortic valve is hemodynamically excellent and a safe prosthesis in selected patients due to a simple and fast implantation technique. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless aortic bioprosthesis is feasible, also with a minimally invasive approach. The Perceval S showed lower operative times and moderate paravalvular leaks and lower mean transvalvular gradients than did the 3f Enable, related to the larger diameter of the Perceval S implanted. Both prostheses showed an excellent hemodynamic performance. This new technology needs long-term follow-up.

Kunlun He

Chinese PLA General Hospital, China

Title: Prediction model of in-hospital adverse cardiac events in patients with heart failure

Time : 12:00-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Kunlun He has completed his Medical School degree from The Third Military Medical University, PhD from Chinese PLA Medical School, and Post-doctoral studies from College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. He is the Vice President of Chinese PLA General Hospital, and the Professor of Department of Cardiology. In recent years, he focuses on Translational Medicine of Cardiovascular disease. He has published more than 158 peer reviewed papers, achieved the first class awards of Beijing Science and Technology, and also has been serving as Editorial Board Members for three medical journals.

Abstract:

Objectives: Early prediction and identification of the onset of adverse cardiac events in high-risk patients are of great significance for preemptive treatment and a better prognosis. We sought to establish a risk evaluation model to predict the adverse cardiac events during hospitalization in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: In-hospital, patients with HF was randomly selected from intensive care units of Chinese PLA General Hospital. Patients were then allocated into model derivation group and validation group, respectively. In the derivation group, independent risk factors for adverse cardiac events were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. We established a prediction score system using the independent risk factors. In the validation group, receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC) and C-statistic testing were utilized to assess the performance of the constructed model in comparison with a previous published Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) model. Results: The binary logistic regression analysis revealed that the level of heart rate, left ventricular ejection fraction, pH value, renal dysfunction and NT-pro BNP are independent risk factors of adverse cardiac events during hospitalization for HF patients. The effectiveness of our risk prediction score system (PSS) is better than modified early warning score (MEWS) system. Conclusions: Through data analysis of patients with heart failure, we found heart rate, left ventricular ejection fraction, pH value, renal dysfunction and NT-pro BNP were closely associated with adverse cardiac events during hospitalization. It has important significance for the precision risk stratification of in-hospital patients with heart failure.

Speaker
Biography:

Sung Ho Shinn is an Associate Professor of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery in Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, South Korea. He has completed his graduation and PhD from Hanyang University, South Korea. He was a Clinical Fellow of Cardiovascular Surgery in Mayo Clinic, Rochester USA between 2011 and 2013. He was also a Research Collaborator in Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA in 2014. He is currently a Board Member of Korean society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular surgery. His research interests include tricuspid valve surgery for functional tricuspid regurgiatation, trans-catheter aortic valve replacement, and hybrid aortic surgery.

Abstract:

Functional tricuspid regurgitation is mainly caused by left heart disease, specifically mitral or aortic valve disease, but the etiology is multi-factorial. The functional tricuspid regurgitation had been ignored due to the previous recognition of “the disease of forgotten valve”. However, the correction of functional tricuspid regurgitation is recognized as the procedure influencing the prognosis of the function of right heart recently and the studies for this have been introduced. The author wants to explain the pathophysiology of the functional tricuspid regurgitation and when and how to fix the tricuspid valve for functional tricuspid regurgitation, especially which is better suture or ring annuloplasty, in the perspective of cardiac surgeon.

Break: Lunch Break 13:00-14:00 @ Source Grill

Yousry el-Moazamy

Prince Sultan Cardiac Center, Saudi Arabia

Title: Proactive surgical intervention for acute massive pulmonary embolism

Time : 14:00-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Will be updated soon...

Abstract:

Background: Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is life-threatening complication in hospitalized patients. Optimal management of massive PE remains controversial. Despite advances in thrombolytic therapy major bleeding was reported in many series. Urgent surgical embolectomy has been the treatment of choice in patients with hemodynamic instability. We believe that patients with more or less stable hemodynamic, aggressive surgical intervention have beneficial with good outcome and still superior to medical treatment. Patients: 19 hospitalized patients suffered massive PE. Diagnoses were as follow: Post partum (n: 6), post RTA (n: 5), acute abdomen (n: 2), diagnosed intra-op (n: 2), failure of thrombolytic therapy (n: 2), one pre-op and one transferred from another hospital as acute on top of chronic PE. TEE confirmed the presence of huge clots in the heart and intra-pericardial pulmonary arteries. All patients were underwent surgical removal of the clots. Mean bypass time was 123.83 min, clamp time 57.50 min. Five patients suffered of low cardiac output required vasopressor and dopamine early postoperative. The mortality was one patient transferred from another hospital with acute on top of chronic massive PE and one pre-op patient waiting open heart surgery. Conclusion: Early aggressive surgical intervention for even hemodynamically stable patients may constitute an important form for treatment of in hospital massive pulmonary embolism with good outcome. TEE is the best tool to confirm the presence of associated intra-cardiac and intra-pulmonary thrombi helping the surgeon to locate embolus site.

Speaker
Biography:

Ayman Raweh is a Surgeon in Heart Center Dortmund in Germany and studied Medicine between 2000 and 2006 then continued to specialize in Cardiac Surgery. His research focus includes aortic diseases and aortic surgery since 2010 and currently minimal invasive mitral valve repair. He is a member of several national and international Cardiac Surgery Associations including the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) in Europe, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) in USA and the German Society of Cardiothoracic Surgery (DGTHG) in Germany.

Abstract:

The aortic valved prosthesis is a reliable solution to repair the aneurysm in aortic root and ascending aorta with involved aortic valve. The introduction of biological valved conduits brought important benefits to a large group of patients suffering from the anticoagulation therapy. Two of the most commonly used pre-sewn stentless biological conduits are BioValsalva™ and BioIntegral BioConduit™. As a result of the lack of comparative studies between the different biological valved conduits, there was a need to review the midterm haemodynamic performance of these two conduits. Between July 2008 and June 2014, a total of 55 patients underwent aortic root replacement using a Bio-Valsalva conduit (n=27) or a Bio-Integral conduit (n=28). The median echocardiographic followup for the Bio-Valsalva group was 44.0 months compared with 8.4 months for the Bio-Integral group. The echocardiographic followup for the Bio-Integral group was shorter because of the later introduction of Bio-Integral prosthesis to the market. It was hypothesized that, the Bio-Integral prosthesis with no sewing ring will provide benefits to the in valve haemodynamics; however, these potential benefits were not observed when compared with the Bio-Valsalva prosthesis in our echocardiographic follow-up. The effective orifice area in the Bio-Valsalva group was 1.85 cm² compared with 1.80 cm² in the Bio-Integral group (p=0.24). The mean pressure gradient in the Bio-Valsalva group was 11.0 mm Hg compared with 11.5 in the Bio-Integral group (p=0.82). In conclusion, we did not observe a significant difference in the outcome between the two biological valved conduits, and both of them had excellent outcomes.

  • Special Session
Location: UK
Speaker

Chair

Magdy Abdel Hamid

Cairo University, Egypt

Session Introduction

Magdy Abdel Hamid

Cairo University, Egypt

Title: Heart failure guidelines, 2016: 10 points to remember

Time : 14:30-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Magdy Abdel Hamid is a Professor of Cardiology at the Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt. He is a Secretary of the scientific committee upgrade for Cardiology, Egyptian Universities Promotion Committees. In addition, he has been nominated as the secretary of the Egyptian Society of Cardiology on March, 2016. He had a certificate from Harvard medical school for excellent performance and successful contribution to the program of heart failure at Brigham and Women’s hospital, 1999. He has received several awards including the Certificate of Appreciation and Medal of excellence from Egyptian Medical Syndicate in Cairo 2003 for excellence in service to the medical community. He is a member of numerous international societies such as the American College of Cardiology, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), European Society of Cardiology and European Association of Cardiovascular Intervention (EPACI). Prof Abdel Hamid has presented at several international conferences and published many original manuscripts in several peer review journals. The last two papers were recently published in the International Journal of Cardiology (January2016) and the Journal of Interventional Cardiology (February 2016). Prof Abdel Hamid has participated in many research projects and international registries and is the present principal investigator at Cairo university site for a multicenter international study (ISCHEMIA trial), the study which might change the practice of medicine in management of stable coronary artery disease. Prof Abdel Hamid has contributed to cardiology books including the Heart Failure Manual and Guidelines of Hypertension for Egyptian Hypertension Society (2002 and 2015). Prof Abdel Hamid is a clinical reviewer for many local and international Journals.

Abstract:

  • Session: Cardiovascular Medicine
Location: UK
Speaker

Chair

Cathy M Holt

University of Manchester, UK

Session Introduction

Cathy M Holt

University of Manchester, UK

Title: Translational models of cardiovascular disease: What have we learnt?

Time : 15:00-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Cathy M Holt was awarded her PhD at the University of Sheffield where she was subsequently appointed as Lecturer. She then moved to University of Manchester where she leads a research team investigating the causes and prevention of vascular occlusion and stem cell approaches for the treatment of myocardial infarction. She currently serves on the British Atherosclerosis Society committee. She is on the Editorial Board of the journal "Clinical Science" and is Section Head for the Cardiovascular Physiology/Circulation Section in Faculty of 1000. In addition she has a teaching role and was recently awarded Senior Fellowship from the Higher Education Academy.

Abstract:

Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) engineered to secrete a Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) fusion protein and encapsulated in alginate (GLP-1 Cell-Beads) were developed as a novel therapy for myocardial regeneration post infarction. The effect of this therapy was assessed in an in vivo pig model of myocardial infarction and an in vitro human model of cardiomyocyte ischemia. GLP-1 Cell-Beads were delivered to the left anterior descending coronary artery branches in pigs, creating micro-infarcts. Cell-free beads (empty) and Cell-Beads containing MSCs without GLP-1 (Beads-MSC) were delivered as controls. Echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular function and infarct size was measured macroscopically. Tissue was analyzed for: Inflammation, apoptosis, collagen content and myofibroblast number. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to examine the ultra-structure of the collagen scar. To examine direct effects on apoptosis, human adult cardiomyocytes underwent ischemia followed by incubation with MSC conditioned media echocardiography confirmed MI in all experimental groups of pigs. Four weeks post-MI, treatment with GLP-1 Cell-Beads significantly improved LVEF and limited infarct expansion. Beads-MSCs increased inflammation, which was reduced by GLP-1. Collagen content was increased in the infarct of Bead-MSC and Beads GLP-1 MSC groups compared to the empty bead group, which was associated with a decreased number of myofibroblasts and alterations in the collagen fiber structure. No differences in apoptosis were observed between groups in the in vivo model, however, significantly fewer TUNEL+ cells were observed in human cardiomyocytes in vitro. In conclusion, GLP-1 Cell-Beads have a beneficial effect on healing following MI. The effects are due to a combination of both the GLP-1 and paracrine factors released from the MSCs. These findings require further validation prior to clinical translation.

Yaping Tian

Chinese PLA General Hospital, China

Title: Cardiovascular diseases related microRNA finding and potential clinical significance

Time : 15:30-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Yaping Tian is the Professor of Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Chinese PLA General Hospital and Military Medical School. He is also a Professor at Nankai University, and at the Tsinghua University. He has received his Master’s Degree in Medicine from Chinese PLA Postgraduate Medical School in the year 1989 and PhD from Academy of Military Medical Sciences in 1993. He had been trained as Postdoctoral Fellow for 2 years (1995-1997) in The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Australia. He has been focusing on the study of the specific serum proteomic profiles and genetic signatures in different diseases, especially on cancer and cardiovascular diseases. He also focused on the studies of antioxidants in herbal medicine and free radical biology and has received more than 20 grants and published more than 300 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals. He is on the Editorial Boards of several journals and the Honor Chairman of Clinical Biochemistry and Applied Molecular Biology Association, CSBMB.

Abstract:

Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease with a long asymptomatic phase. Therefore, early finding of the risks of atherosclerosis, and then changing one’s lifestyle, preventing and treating the disease at an early stage are very important. Finding sensitive and no invasive biomarkers of atherosclerosis in blood is necessary. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small, noncoding regulatory RNAs. They could inversely regulate the expression of their target genes at the post-transcriptional level by inhibiting translation or causing the degradation of the target messenger RNA (mRNA). miRNAs play a crucial role in the development of animals, by regulating the formation of tissues and organs. Previous studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are present in clinical samples of plasma and serum in a remarkably stable form, and they are often regulated in a tissue- and pathology specific manner. The use of circulating miRNAs as clinical biomarkers has generated great interest. Solexa sequencing followed by bioinformatics analysis have been used to predict the novel miRNAs in control individuals (n=15), coronary disease (AS) patients (n=15) and unstable angina pectoris (UAP) patients (n=15). Four miRNAs were discovered and validated in large scale number of clinical blood sample. All of them have been registered in microRNA database (http://mirbase.org). The bioinformatics analysis suggested that most of them might be involved in the disease process, including the regulation of Rho protein signal transduction, cell migration, and the induction of apoptosis.

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break: 16:00-16:15 @ Outside Room

Sang Joon Lee

Pohang University of Science & Technology, South Korea

Title: In vivo velocity field measurements of circulatory blood flows using X-ray PIV technique

Time : 16:15-16:45

Speaker
Biography:

Sang Joon Lee received his PhD from KAIST in 1986. Ever since, he has been a Professor of Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH). He is the Director of BBRC (Center for Biofluid Flow and Biomimic Research) sponsored by Korean Government. He was selected as a POSTECH fellow in 2010 and APS fellow in 2014. He has published more than 320 papers in reputed international journals and has been serving as Editorial Board Member of several journals.

Abstract:

In vivo measurement of hemodynamic information from real blood flows in arteries is very important for investigating the pathologies of circulatory vascular diseases. Especially in vivo experiments using animal disease models are essential for investigating the effects of various clinical treatments on hemodynamic parameters in the animal models. To get hemodynamic information of various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), X-ray PIV (particle image velocimetry) technique in which X-ray beam is used as a transmissiontype light source was developed. At first, the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique for measuring blood flows was confirmed through in vitro tests. Then surface-modified gold nanoparticles and biocompatible CO2 microbubbles were developed as tracer particles of blood flows. The X-ray PIV was found to have high temporal and spatial resolution to measure real pulsatile blood flows in a nondestructive manner with micrometer resolution. For in vivo X-ray PIV measurements, tracer particles were injected into rat models directly or to the extracorporeal loop connecting a microtube between the jugular vein and abdominal artery of a rat model. The velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows was obtained with varying flow rate and pulsatility. This new advanced flow visualization technique could be effectively used to investigate hemodynamic and hemorheological features of blood flows related with CVDs.

  • Workshop
Location: UK
Speaker

Chair

Jeffrey R Bender

Yale University School of Medicine, USA

Session Introduction

Jeffrey R Bender

Yale University School of Medicine, USA

Title: Effects of estrogen on vascular function and health: Controversies in hormone replacement therapy

Time : 16:45-17:45

Speaker
Biography:

Jeffrey R Bender graduated from the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine in 1979. He works in New Haven, CT and specializes in Cardiovascular Disease. Jeffrey R Bender is affiliated with Yale New Haven Hospital.

Abstract:

There is a longstanding debate about whether hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is protective against heart disease in postmenopausal women. This is in light of non-randomized epidemiological data demonstrating an increased incidence of coronary heart disease in premenopausal women, compared to age-matched males, and protection of ovariectomized women by estrogen use. Secondary and primary prevention trials of HRT have been conflicting and controversial. Most recent data have been supportive of estrogen preventing or delaying CV pathology, when therapy is started early, i.e., in the perimenopausal period. It is imperative to understand the mechanisms by which estrogen can be protective. Indeed, estrogen has potent effects on the vascular endothelium. Normal homeostasis of a healthy endothelium is critical to maintain an anti-atherosclerotic state. The key, athero-protective molecule of this homeostatic endothelium is nitric oxide (NO). Estrogen is a potent activator of the endothelial enzyme that generates NO, eNOS, through activation of plasma membrane estrogen receptors and a sequential signaling cascade involving the kinases c-Src, PI-3 kinase and Akt. This is therefore mediated through the "nongenomic" pathway of steroid hormone activation, mediated most notably by a splice inform of the estrogen receptor, ER46, in human endothelial cells (ECs). In fact, there is a transmembrane version of endothelial ER46, demonstrated by elegant plasma membrane imaging studies. It is this transmembrane version that creates a huge selective therapeutic targeting opportunity. The molecular features of this receptor will be discussed, as will the controversy of HRT use in postmenopausal women, for cardiovascular protection.